20%

OFF*

your First Order with Us when you subscribe to our Newsletters

SIGN UP FOR A TREAT

Receive first-hand access to exclusive discounts, helpful tips and advice on all things health & wellness for your dog.
* Valid for Online Shop Purchases Only. Does not Apply to Products Already on Offer.

How to tell if your dog is overheated and what to do about it?

Do you know the 5-second rule?

No, not Mel Robbins (which, by the way, you should definitely check out here, if you haven’t heard about her lifechanging 5- second rule)

I’m talking about the 5 Second Rule that says ‘on a hot summer’s day, if you can’t keep your hand on the pavement for 5 seconds, don’t walk your dog on it!’

I think I’m right in saying that we all enjoy this warm, sunny weather? Even though we want to enjoy this experience with our dogs as much as possible too (because we just don’t know how long it’s going to last!) we have to be very careful not to let our dogs overheat.

At this time of the year, I usually walk my dog very early in the morning or late at night. Especially my Scotties, with their thick coat and short legs, and their bodies close to the hot ground, they don’t enjoy the heat. I always have to make sure there are plenty of shaded areas on our walks, and a place to rest, away from the sunlight.

As we know, dogs cool down by panting, not sweating. But when a dog is overheated:

  • The panting becomes more rapid and excessive
  • The gums, tongue, and skin around the eyes becomes dark pink or red
  • The dog is drooling a thick saliva
  • The dog has a worried, anxious expression as he is in distress.

Some breeds are more prone to heatstroke than others. Brachycephalic breeds like the Bulldog, Pug, and Boxer have more difficulties cooling the air through their very short nasal cavities. Dogs with a heavy double coat, short legged dogs, old dogs, young puppies, and overweight dogs are more vulnerable to overheating.

Overheating can be life-threatening if not treated immediately, noticing the early signs of heat exhaustion will reduce the chances of canine heatstroke and death.

What do you do?

1/ Give your dog cool, fresh water to drink, but don’t force him. If he doesn’t want to drink wet his tongue, but don’t pour it into his mouth as he may suck it into his lungs.

2/ Put a cool towel on your dog’s throat, armpits and between his back legs, and wet his ears and paw pads. If you are outdoors, a stream or pond can be used to help him cool down.

3/ If your dog is not improving, transport him to the vet. Your dog may have to receive oxygen, some fluids, and other treatments. With severe overheating, seizure and/or cardiac arrest may occur

Check our other blog post from last year, Clip or not to clip, that explains why shaving your dog in summer is also not a good idea.

Stay cool and hydrated, until next week!

Jitka xx

Are you ready to rescue?

When I first came to the UK, my English wasn’t very good. During that time I was improving my hand stripping skills in the Saredon Kennels and occasionally doing a few pet trims. One day a gentleman came in with a small fluff ball, very cute and a little unsure. He told us that she was a rescue. I was delighted and told him that my first dog was as well! But I did wonder how this small fragile girl managed to do all the hard training required for a search and rescue dog. You see I thought “rescue dog” was the same as a “search and rescue dog.” Tricky business this English language!

As you know my friends and I are organising the UK’s first ever charity dog grooming competition, Style to Rescue, on Saturday the 19th May. As we are getting closer, we are getting more excited and busier than ever. There’s so much to think about and to sort out to ensure the day will go smoothly.

All the groomers are looking forward to the challenge. They will have plenty of time to become familiar with the dogs, and will have 3 hours to complete the groom, which is much more than at other competitions. The dogs and groomers will have a break during the grooming, and can ask for extra help with handling if needed. In their goody bags they will find, among other lovely stuff,

Aromatic Dog Spray Floral  which will help them and the dogs to keep calm.

We are also having a Groomers bake off 😊 The groomers are bringing cakes which will be tasted by a blindfolded judge. After the judging, the cake will be sold so we can raise even more money for the rescue centres.

We have some amazing raffle prizes kindly sponsored by fellow groomers and numerous companies. You can see our full sponsor list on www.style2rescue.co.uk

There will also be amazing, not to be missed, seminars running during the day:
9:30 – Pets First Aid with Jan Gallier

10:30 – Tellington Touch with Marie Miller

11:30 – Emmi Pet Toothcare and Demonstration with Sally Hart

12:30 – Dog Behaviour and Training with Craig Flint, aka The Dog-Man

13:30 – Grooming demonstration, Asian Style Mini. Schnauzer, with Lisa Hart

15:00 – Trick Training with Lynne Land and Mojo the Toy Poodle

15:45 – Canine Coat Care with Sue Oliver

And let’s not forget the kids! We are going to have a Kids Corner kindly sponsored and organised by my friend Alice Ward. The kiddies can compete in creative grooming with model dogs; create artworks, guess how many dots the (toy) Dalmatian dog has; guess the name of the Scottie toy dog … and more!

If you are not going to the Royal Wedding and you like dogs, why don’t you come down to the show where the whole family can learn something new, meet friends or make new one! It’s going to be a unique and fun experience for everyone!

We look forward to seeing you there 😊

Jitka xx

Tips for travelling with your dog

Summer …

The beautiful, sunny and hot bank holiday weekend is behind us, but let’s hope we will get more days like these! We have another bank holiday at the end of this month, so if you decide to travel with your dogs, here are few things you should know/consider before setting off.

Travelling & travel sickness

Dogs can suffer from motion sickness, just the same as us humans. Dog motion sickness is more common in puppies and young dogs, and the reason is that the ear structure used for balance is not yet fully developed. In some dogs, however, the motion sickness continues into old age, and if a dog has experienced travel sickness, he or she can quickly connect the car journey with not feeling well, which can cause stress. Typical signs of stress are panting, wide open eyes, lip licking, and shaking.

To help your dog it is very important to change his associations with the vehicle. Make sure your dog is facing forward, don’t feed your dog before traveling, or keep to a minimum, make frequent stops, and offer him water. Use natural calming products like Casper’s owner Kristy:

“My dog has suffered from car sickness since a puppy. I’ve tried everything but he would still have anxiety and sickness. I was introduced to Aromatic Dog Spray Floral from Vita Canis [https://www.vitacanis.co.uk/product/aromatic-dog-spray-floral/], with amazing results. Casper calms straight away and slept most of the way. I did build the spray up through the journey and he kept calm all the way for the first time, making the holiday less stressful for all the family” Kristy Worsell with Casper

Before going on holiday in a car, gradually accustom your dog to car travel by taking him or her on short journeys.

NEVER LEAVE A DOG IN A CAR!

When the weather is heating up it is more important than ever not to leave a dog in a car. I don’t think people realise when the temperature outside is about 20 degree Celsius, in the car it is well over 40. And this happens in minutes! As dogs don’t sweat and they regulate their temperature by panting, in a small closed space like a car they will run out of fresh air very quickly …

Traveling abroad

It is pretty easy to travel with your pet to Europe these days. All you need to do is get a passport, and your vet will be able to help you with that. Your dogs must be microchipped and he/she will need a rabies vaccination. When you are planning your journey back to the UK don’t forget that one to five days before you return to the UK you must visit a local vet. He will check your dog, scan his microchip, and give him a tapeworm tablet. The vet will also sign your dog’s passport. If you fail to do this, your dog may face quarantine or be sent back to the country you have travelled from. So make sure you check the passport, again and again and again!

If you can’t take your dog with you

If for some reason you can’t take your dog with you on your holiday you have many options to consider. You can ask your relative or a friend to move to your house, you can take your dog to his/hers dog sitter, find a home boarding, find a boarding kennel or you can even ask your neighbour to look after your dog. From my experience as an owner of a small boarding
kennel, dogs adapt pretty quickly to the new surroundings. Sometimes with a little help of the Comfort Blend [https://www.vitacanis.co.uk/product/comfort-blend/], a natural product specifically designed for separation anxiety.

“I’ve been having major problems with my young pups’ separation anxiety for 4 months now and was at my wits end after her howling and barking for 4 hours solid when I went out on Friday evening. Today I used Vita Canis Comfort Blend on her when we went out in the car and she had to be left a few times and then I left her in the house for just over an hour. I left my phone on to record her to see what noise she made and returned to find only 6 minutes of crying & then nothing!! Amazing results from an amazing product!!” Sarah Bakewell, Birmingham

What People Say...

Used you’re Calming Floral  Spray yesterday was so impressed with it . I had a dog in my salon that has dryer seizures and gets anxious. I sprayed it around her and was remarkable the difference in her behaviour. It actually worked so well I had to check dog was okay she was very relaxed snoozing I’ve tried other remedy’s with no real effect shall be sticking with your calming spray from now on 😍
Lisa Addison